Congenital Heart Disease Multi-Societal Project to Create a Universal Encyclopedia for Definitions of Preoperative Risk Factors and Postoperative Complications Related to Congenital Heart Surgery and Interventions

Doctor's Name: 
Jeffrey Phillip Jacobs, M.D.
Hospital/Institution: 
Cardiac Surgical Associates

Tremendous progress has been made in the field of pediatric heart surgery over the last 30 years. Pediatric heart problems that in the past were untreatable and lethal are now treated routinely with great success. Overall, 96% of children who undergo pediatric heart surgery survive and go home. Although survival after heart surgery on children has improved dramatically, complications after heart surgery still occur. These complications are sometimes quite harmful to these children.

A high percentage of ongoing research studies in the field of pediatric heart surgery now focus on decreasing these complication after heart surgery. In an effort to decrease these complications, they are tracked, analyzed, measured and studied in databases. Over the last several years, efforts have focused on unifying the databases of pediatric cardiac surgery, pediatric cardiology, pediatric cardiac anesthesia and pediatric critical care. This work has been undertaken through a collaborative effort involving representatives of the societies listed above.

The product of this proposal will be the publication of two Journal Supplements:

  1. A universal encyclopedia for definitions of complications related to congenital heart surgery and interventions.
  2. A universal encyclopedia for definitions of postoperative risk factors related to congenital heart surgery and interventions.

These publications will serve as a template for future research. These definitions will be applied to the many multi-institutional databases in the field of congenital heart disease. Therefore, common definitions for postoperative risk factors and postoperative complications will be used in the databases of all four congenital heart disease subspecialities involved in this project: pediatric and congenital cardiac surgeons, cardiologists, intensivists and anesthesiologists. These definitions can also be employed for specific lesion based research studying any form of treatment of congenital heart disease.

The final product of this research will therefore serve as an important and needed tool to facilitate ongoing and further research studies in the field of pediatric heart surgery that focus on decreasing the complications of pediatric heart surgery and interventions.

Award Date 1: 
2006
Award Amount 1: 
$50,000
Award Date 2: 
2007
Award Amount 2: 
$50,000